Monthly Archives: April 2014

Marcos-Punch

When Work Becomes A War Zone

When work becomes a war zoneIt’s been all over the news. Marcos Ambrose has punched Casey Mears after the race. These are role models to many people. And the racecourse is their workplace.

What makes people think that it’s ok to bring violence, of any kind, into the workplace? At what point does a person ‘lose it’ and lash out at another? This happens all too often. Violence and aggression is rife in many workplaces. As to why this happens, well that’s the topic of another blog. In Australia, in most workplaces, overt violence is not tolerated. That’s appropriate. But what about other types of violence? Most of us have been on the receiving end of ‘passive aggression’ at some point. The irony is that there’s nothing passive about it. Yet, in many workplaces passive aggression is either tolerated or nothing is done about it.


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Sadly, some people are really good at it and some others are remarkably good at it to the point of sociopathic behavior. But these types of behaviours can have a deep impact on the psychological wellbeing of the workplace and its members. How many people need to be harmed before it impacts on your team?: only one. That can be the start of the downward spiral into workcover claims, low morale, low productivity, etc. In circumstances like this, it’s important to rip out any roots of distress and discontent asap. Leaders need to send the clear message that these types of aggressive behaviours will not be tolerated. There is no room for aggression in a highly productive team. Commit to stamp out all aggression or violence from your teams. Where do you start? ‘Prevention is better than cure’ is a good rule of thumb.

 

If you want to check out the Marcos story go to https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nascar/2014/04/26/marcos-ambrose-punches-casey-mears-after-richmond-race/8239235/

Author: Peter Diaz
Peter-Diaz-AuthorPeter Diaz is the CEO of Workplace Mental Health Institute. He’s an author and accredited mental health social worker with senior management experience. Having recovered from his own experience of bipolar depression, Peter is passionate about assisting organisations to address workplace mental health issues in a compassionate yet results-focussed way. He’s also a Dad, Husband, Trekkie and Thinker.

Connect with Peter Diaz on:
Peter Diaz on Google Plus Peter Diaz on Face Book Peter Diaz on LinkedIn

Ten-Essential-Element

10 Essential Elements of a Workplace Wellness Strategy

1 in 5 people are impacted by mental health problems (Read our discussion paper) every year in Australia. That means that at least 1 in 5 of your employees will either experiencing a full blown mental health crisis, or an unidentified one.

This is well known to impact on productivity, absenteeism, presenteeism, workplace injuries and accidents, and team morale.

Not only that, but the expense of these problems to Australian businesses has been identified as up to $3.6 billion every year. The average psychological injury claim itself costs $250,000.

When compared to the tax on time and money, a business with a solid Workplace Wellness Strategy makes good financial and human sense.

Ten-Essential-Element

Many businesses are now implementing a Workplace Wellness Strategy as part of, or alongside, their Workplace Health & Safety plan. But a Workplace Wellness Strategy doesn’t always come easily. What are the essential elements of a Workplace Wellness Strategy?


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This week we look at the first essential element……

Essential Element #1: EDUCATION

Education is absolutely vital, and is usually the first place to start.

A good Workplace Wellness strategy includes training in mental health and workplace wellness for all staff, as well as specialist education for leaders.

Traditionally, organisations have not made themselves responsible for the mental and emotional wellbeing of staff. In fact as a society, we have very poor mental health literacy. So before a Workplace Wellness Strategy can really be developed and implemented, organisations, and the individuals within them need to educate themselves about mental health.

The whole team, but especially the leaders, need to understand how the human brain works and what will hinder or promote wellness within the team. Gone are the days when bosses didn’t need to know anything about psychology. This generation has higher expectations of support from their leaders. Leaders have to be well prepared, in order to have the stamina necessary to meet the new expectations of their workers.

By providing education in mental health and workplace wellness, leaders of an organisation are also sending the message that this conversation is not only acceptable, but welcomed within the culture of the company.

But is education enough? We don’t think so. Stay tuned for the next essential element for your Workplace Wellness Strategy

 

“If you think education is expensive, try ignorance”
– Harvard President Derek Bok

Author: Peter Diaz
Peter-Diaz-AuthorPeter Diaz is the CEO of Workplace Mental Health Institute. He’s an author and accredited mental health social worker with senior management experience. Having recovered from his own experience of bipolar depression, Peter is passionate about assisting organisations to address workplace mental health issues in a compassionate yet results-focussed way. He’s also a Dad, Husband, Trekkie and Thinker.

Connect with Peter Diaz on:
Peter Diaz on Google Plus Peter Diaz on Face Book Peter Diaz on LinkedIn

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